Extras: How Lightning Ridge got its name

Lightning Ridge was named after an event that occurred in the late 1800s, when a flock of 600 sheep, the shepherd and his dog were killed by a lightning strike on an ironstone ridge. Here are some extra photos from behind the scenes of the IDU video about Lightning Ridge's unusual name:

Above: Various photographs in and around Fred Bodel's camp, one of the oldest remaining structures in the Lightning Ridge area, and the only remaining building in the old Nettleton settlement on the Three Mile field. Note the materials used to construct the shack: local stone, corrugated iron scraps, pressed tin sheeting, timber "props" (straight logs used to support the ceiling of opal mine tunnels). Inside the hut's two rooms we find a bedroom with carpet floor laid directly on the dirt, a sitting area with fireplace and mantel, and a kitchen stocked with period items (the fly spray may be more modern).

Filming outside Fred's hut. Here, Barbara is discussing the history and demise of the Nettleton settlement, one of the three phases of Lightning Ridge's development, after the Wallangulla township in the early 1900s, and the later Lightning Ridge surveyed town.

Filming outside Fred's hut. Here, Barbara is discussing the history and demise of the Nettleton settlement, one of the three phases of Lightning Ridge's development, after the Wallangulla township in the early 1900s, and the later Lightning Ridge surveyed town.

Filming some unused conversation in the breezeway of Fred Bodel's hut.

Filming some unused conversation in the breezeway of Fred Bodel's hut.

Stopping off at the First Shaft Lookout, a key location in Lightning Ridge history and a spectacular view of the flat horizon.

Stopping off at the First Shaft Lookout, a key location in Lightning Ridge history and a spectacular view of the flat horizon.

Filming at the site of Lightning Ridge's naming -- this is (supposedly) where the lightning struck the sheep, shepherd and dog.

Filming at the site of Lightning Ridge's naming -- this is (supposedly) where the lightning struck the sheep, shepherd and dog.

The Castlereagh Highway at the town naming site. Local artist John Murray's gigantic sculpture of Stanley the Emu stands on the left, built from a Volkswagen beetle body suspended above the ground on steel beams.

The Castlereagh Highway at the town naming site. Local artist John Murray's gigantic sculpture of Stanley the Emu stands on the left, built from a Volkswagen beetle body suspended above the ground on steel beams.